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Publications – Ecologic Legal

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Wildlife Crime

Study for the ENVI Committee
In the context of preparing an EU Action Plan against Wildlife Trafficking, the European Parliament commissioned a study to analyze wildlife crime in the EU, in particular the level and quality of enforcement in Member States. This study provided numerous insights on how to enhance the fight against wildlife crime. First, a higher priority should be placed on combating wildlife crime at the political level in addition to the measures taken by enforcement bodies. Secondly, Member States should provide for the specialization of enforcement staff and units. Finally, the report highlights the need for improved data collection, better cooperation and more demand reduction measures. The study is available for download.Read more

Analysis of Wildlife Crime in Five Member States

In-depth analysis
The Ecologic Institute, together with a consortium, conducted a study on wildlife crime, which gives an overview over the state of wildlife crime in Europe. As as a basis for this study, in-depth analyses were carried out for five EU member states. Ecologic Institute conducted the in-depth analysis of wildlife crime in Germany. The analysis concludes that Germany is not a main destination for illegal wildlife products from iconic species, but still an important destination for live animals like reptiles for the pet market. It is also an important transit country for ivory and other illegally traded animal parts from Western and Central Africa with East and South-East Asia as the main region of destination. The studies were compiled on behalf of the European Parliament and are available for download.Read more

European Union Action to Fight Environmental Crime (EFFACE): Conclusions and Recommendations

on fighting environmental crime more effectively
A new report presents the conclusions and policy recommendations of the EU-funded research project, "European Union Action to Fight Environmental Crime" (EFFACE). The report includes recommendations for action to better combat environmental crime at the EU and Member State level, distinguishing between core and supplementary recommendations. In addition to these recommendations, questions for further research are identified. The report is available for download.Read more

TTIP und Klimawandel - Risiko oder Chance?

In a book chapter, Christiane Gerstetter, Senior Fellow at Ecologic Institute, analyses the impact that the planned Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnerhip (TTIP) between the EU and the US could have on climate change. The book chapter is written in German. It is part of an edited volume entitled "Globalisierung, Freihandel und Umweltschutz in Zeiten von TTIP", which deals with various facets of the trade and environment debate.Read more

The Paris Agreement: Analysis, Assessment and Outlook

Background paper for the workshop "Beyond COP21: what does Paris mean for future climate policy?"
Ecologic Institute's new research paper provides a comprehensive overview and assessment of the Paris Agreement, including the agreed next steps, an outlook on implementation and key political messages. It is now available for download.Read more

Evaluation of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Threats and Opportunities Associated with EU Efforts to Combat Environmental Crime

Evaluation of the role of the EU and SWOT analysis
One of the main outcomes of the EU-funded FP7 project "European Union Action to Fight Environmental Crime" (EFFACE) is the report 'Evaluation of the strengths, weaknesses, threats and opportunities (SWOT) associated with EU efforts to combat environmental crime'. This SWOT analysis brings together insights gained during the previous EFFACE research and evaluates the current approaches of the EU and its Member States in combating environmental crime. The analysis is available for download.Read more

Mid-term Evaluation of the Renewable Energy Directive

A study in the context of the REFIT programme
The Renewable Energy Directive (RED) established a framework for promoting renewable energy development in all sectors, including binding national renewable energy targets and a mandatory target of 10% for all Member States for renewable energy use in transport. Commissioned by DG Energy, a consortium composed of CE Delft, Ricardo-AEA, Ecologic Institute, E-Bridge and REKK carried out an assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency so far of measures and actions laid down in the Directive. Stephan Sina, Christine Lucha, Andreas Prahl and Lenat Donat contributed to the study. The study is available for download.Read more

Schiedsgerichtshof für Investitionsstreitigkeiten

Lösung für fairen internationalen Investitionsschutz?
Investment protection and investment tribunals are among the most contentious subjects of TTIP and CETA. Could a permanent Court of Arbitration address the problems of ad hoc tribunals? In this comment (German only), Nils Meyer-Ohlendorf discusses the pro and cons of a permanent Court of Arbitration. The comment is available for download.



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Research on Actors, Institutions and Instruments Relevant for Fighting Environmental Crime

One facet of the "European Union Action to Fight Environmental Crime" (EFFACE) project, coordinated by Ecologic Institute, is research on the instruments, actors, and institutions involved in the fight against environmental crime. The overall work consists of a main report and a variety of studies, focusing on specific legal provisions, institutions, and actors at the national, EU, and international levels. The reports by Ecologic Institute and other institutions are available for download.Read more

Can the European Council Impose Consensus on EU Climate Policies?

Since 2007, the European Council has played an increasingly active role in shaping the details of future EU climate policies. This involvement raises important questions about potential interference by the European Council regarding the decision-making process for and content of the implementation of the 2030 climate framework. In a broader perspective, concerns have been raised about the establishment of a constitutional practice, which could in fact circumvent the possibility of adopting implementing acts by qualified majority vote. This would alter the balance of power between the EU institutions. Ecologic Institute's Nils Meyer-Ohlendorf discusses the role and mandate of the European Council. The paper is available for download.



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Understanding the Damages of Environmental Crime

Review of the availability of data
An important part of the work for the "European Union Action to Fight Environmental Crime" (EFFACE) project, coordinated by Ecologic Institute, is the analysis of the costs and impacts of environmental crime. The work includes the collection and analysis of data and information on the extent and the impacts of environmental crime and attempts to estimate the economic costs of the different types of environmental crime. The report "Understanding the Damages of Environmental Crime" is available for download.Read more

Comments on Investment Protection under CETA

Good or bad; new or old?
Is the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) the beginning of a new era of investment protection under free trade agreements, one that addresses long standing concerns surrounding investment protection? The answer to these questions is, by and large, no. CETA's investment chapter is not only superfluous but harmful because, among other reasons, it distorts competition at the expense of domestic competitors. The comments of Dr. Nils Meyer-Ohlendorf, Senior Fellow at Ecologic Institute, are available for download.



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Criteria for Evaluating Climate Policy Scenarios

The international community has come up with numerous and often complex suggestions for the design of a new climate agreement to be adopted during the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris in 2015 (‘2015 Agreement’). These design options are currently being discussed under Workstream 1 of the ‘Ad-hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action’ (ADP) by Parties to the UNFCCC. This report provides a practical criteria matrix to assist policy makers in evaluating and comparing different proposals for the 2015 Agreement.Read more

An Indicator for Measuring Regional Progress Towards the Europe 2020 Targets

To achieve the Europe 2020 goals the EU installed the European semester, a yearly cycle of European policy coordination. Although it was supposed to effect the national level, it also influenced regional and local developments. Thus economic and fiscal governance in the European Union were boosted. This report presents two concepts for an indicator which measures regional progress.Read more

ENVI Relevant Legislative Areas of the EU-US Trade and Investment Partnership Negotiations (TTIP)

Study for the ENVI Committee
A recent study provides the members of the European Parliament Committee on Environment, Public Health, and Food Safety (ENVI Committee) with the needed expertise to monitor the ongoing negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) agreement. The study was co-authored by Ecologic Institute, Bio IS, and the Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP) and serves as a follow-up to a 2013 study entitled "Legal Implications of TTIP for the Acquis Communautaire in ENVI Relevant Sectors."Read more

A Dynamic Adjustment Mechanism for the 2015 Climate Agreement

In this article, Ecologic Institute's Lena Donat and Ralph Bodle provide a structured approach for developing and evaluating options for a dynamic adjustment mechanism in the 2015 climate agreement. To ensure that the 2015 Agreement, that is currently being negotiated under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), provides an effective response to climate change over time, it needs to encorporate flexible and dynamic elements. This should include a possibility for Parties to regularly adjust their mitigation commitments so as to increase the level of ambition and to reflect changing circumstances.Read more

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